Tracking Respiratory Droplets on The Fly

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Covid-19 spreads via droplets expelled from an infected person’s lungs, so determining how the release of moisture is affected by different masks is an important step towards better protective gear. Now, using a new technique in 3D printing, University of Cambridge researchers have created tiny, freestanding, conducting fibers they claim can detect respiratory moisture more effectively than anything currently on the market. 

The researchers demonstrated the fiber sensors by testing the amount of breath moisture that leaks through face coverings. They attached their fiber array to the outside of the mask, wired it to a computer, and found that it outperformed conventional planer chip-based commercial sensors, particularly when monitoring rapid breathing. (A paper describing the invention was published today in the journal Science Advances.) 

Dubbed “inflight fiber printing,” the technique enables the researchers to print the fibers and hook them into a monitoring circuit, all in one step. 

“Previously you could have very small conducting fiber production but it could not be incorporated directly into a circuit,” says Shery Huang, a lecturer in bioengineering at the University of Cambridge who led the research. “The main innovation here is we can directly incorporate these small conducting fibers onto the circuit with designable fiber pattern structures,” she says.

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