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A New Academy Helps E-Sports Players Go Pro

Photo: Chesnot/Getty Images THE INSTITUTE If you’re an avid video game player like IEEE Member Davon Williams, you’ve probably wondered if you could make a career in the world of competitive gaming by, for example, live-streaming your games or becoming a coach or announcer. E-sports companies and organizations want to know whether a prospective employee has the knowledge, training, skills, and professionalism they’re seeking. That’s true whether they’re evaluating potential players or coaches. But no schools have offered a degree or certification programs to validate… 

Unmanned Solar Aircraft Aims to Compete Commercially With Satellites and Drones

At 35 meters, the wingspan of the new BAE Systems aircraft equals that of a Boeing 737, yet the plane weighs in at just 150 kilograms, including a 15 kg payload. The unmanned plane, dubbed the PHASA-35 (Persistent High-Altitude Solar Aircraft), made its maiden voyage on 10 February  at the Royal Australian Air Force Woomera Test Range in South Australia. “It flew for just under an hour—enough time to successfully test its aerodynamics, autopilot system, and maneuverability,” says Phil Varty, business development leader of emerging… 

Rounding up European AI policies and developments

Centralized guidelines as well as individual member states projects highlight efforts around artificial intelligence. The post Rounding up European AI policies and developments appeared first on Robotics Business Review. Read More

A Hard Look at Concrete

Photo: PM Images/Getty Images The ancient Romans were the first to mix sand and gravel with water and a bonding agent to make concrete. Although they called it opus cementitium, the bonding agent differed from that used in modern cement: It was a mixture of gypsum, quicklime, and pozzolana, a volcanic sand from Puteoli, near Mount Vesuvius, that made an outstanding material fit for massive vaults. Rome’s Pantheon, completed in 126 C.E., still spans a greater distance than any other structure made of nonreinforced concrete. The… 

Build a Rover, Send It to the Moon, Sell the Movie Rights: 30 Years of iRobot

This article was originally published on LinkedIn. The views expressed here are solely those of the author and do not represent positions of IEEE Spectrum or the IEEE. Build a rover, send it to the Moon, sell the movie rights. That was our first business model at iRobot. Way back in 1990. We thought it would be how we’d first change the world. It’s ironic, of course, that through that model, changing the world meant sending a robot to another one. Sadly, that business model failed. And it… 

Here’s How Facebook’s Brain-Computer Interface Development is Progressing

In 2017, Facebook announced that it had assigned at least 60 engineers to an effort to build a brain-computer interface (BCI). The goal: allow mobile device and computer users to communicate at a speed of at least 100 words per minute—far faster than anyone can type on a phone. Last July, Facebook-supported researchers at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) published the results of a study demonstrating that Facebook’s prototype brain-computer interface could be used to decode speech in real time—at least speech in… 

Move Over, CMOS: Here Come Snapshots by Quantum Dots

Illustration: Anatomy Blue In the early 2000s, the commercialization of CMOS image sensors led to smaller and smaller—and cheaper and cheaper—digital cameras. Now the thinnest of mobile phones contains at least two camera modules, and all except the most dedicated photographers have stopped carrying a separate camera, concluding that the camera sensors in their phones take pictures that are good enough. But do they? In bright sun, parts of an image are often washed out. In low light, images become grainy and unclear. Colors do…